Nitasha Goel: Founder, The Cure

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Victoria Malloy

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I'm a writer, photographer and environmental advocate with an earth-first perspective on life. This is a place to be inspired to live more consciously, and put the planet at the heart of all that you do.

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In this Earth-First Conversations series, I sit down with brand founders who are blazing trails, empowering lasting change, and building impactful brands with an earth-first vision. Today, I am joined by Nitasha Goel, the Founder of multi-functional skin and body care brand The Cure. She and I talk minimalism, ingredient sourcing, and building trust with consumers.

Q

Tell me about your vision for The Cure. When you set out to create the brand, what were you observing in the beauty industry that made you want to do things differently/better?

A

The Cure Skincare was largely developed because I saw a lack of functional, fuss-free skincare on the market. I wanted to create something easy and simple for me and my family to use as a part of our routine, removing the 10 step process and providing multi-use products. My idea was to help reduce consumption and vanity-top clutter. The feedback was so great, after many years, I slowly began offering these products more broadly to my growing customer base and creating more formulations.


“Simple is always best, in all areas of life.”

– Nitasha Goel, Founder, The Cure


Q

There’s no doubt that we’re all consuming way too much stuff, and the beauty industry has perpetuated this idea of continuous consumption, leading to the beauty “shelfie” with copious amounts of beauty products and the need for routines that consist of dozens of products. What are your thoughts on this and how have you curated your collection to minimize superfluous products by focusing on multipurpose, minimalist skincare?

A

Simple is always best, in all areas of life. Our skin is our largest organ, and what we apply on it has a  deep impact. I set out to create gender-less products that work together in multiple ways. For example, the Face + Neck Serum also doubles as an eye cream, and when combined with the Face Mist, creates a lighter jelly-like moisturizing serum. I believe it’s not about how many products we have, but how they work together to support our skin.


“I want to make sure the products include only ethical, sustainable, and functional components.”


Q

Your formulations are based on skinimalism, utilizing powerful ingredients that don’t require filler. Tell me about the process of selecting your ingredients and what you were striving to achieve with your formulations.

A

All ingredients included in The Cure formulations are selected through extensive research. I want to make sure the products include only ethical, sustainable, and functional components. Each addition is there for a reason- to feed our skin what it needs. My biggest goal with The Cure formulations was to create simple, multi-use skincare for the whole family- removing the need for filler ingredients and greenwashing.

Q

How important a role does ingredient sourcing play in the formulation of your products? Where do you source your ingredients and how do you go about finding the most unadulterated ingredients that are going to most benefit your formulations?

A

As a small-batch business, you need to start somewhere. As we’ve grown, we’ve shifted to purchasing ingredients directly from the farms that harvest them. This doesn’t only support those workers directly, but being without a middleman also significantly decreases our shipping footprint. Right now, we are transitioning ingredient by ingredient- we believe a product is only as good as its sources. The first ingredient we made this transition with was Tamanu Seed Oil, which we source from India. If you cannot afford to purchase farm direct at first, always make sure you’re making ethical selections. Canada’s supply is consistently growing, and when we can find our ingredients locally- it’s a huge bonus.


“Everything is handmade, making our footprint quite small.”


Q

In what ways are you mindful of your brand’s environmental impact? And what do you feel are some of the environmental benefits of being a small batch brand?

A

The Cure collection was built to utilize a lot of similar ingredients, to minimize waste. We infuse our own oils with raw ingredients in the shop. Everything is handmade, making our footprint quite small. There is no heavy machinery or extra processing to be done. We upcycle all of our available empties through drop off boutiques, and are hoping to expand this program in the near future.

Q

Tell me about your product packaging and the ways in which it strives to minimize waste through recycling, upcycling, etc. Can the pipettes/droppers be recycled? Do you have any plans to introduce a recycling program for your customers?

A

All of our packaging is glass, making it recyclable. We also have both a drop off and refill program, providing our packaging a second chance at life. When it comes to the droppers, they are taken apart by hand. The glass portion can be recycled, and the other parts are disposed of. Unfortunately this is necessary for sanitary purposes. We always encourage customers to use their droppers in multiple ways, for kitchen oils, salad dressings, crafts, and plant care. It was incredibly important for me to find beautiful packaging, to encourage people to use it over and over again.


“All of our products are handmade, making it an extremely energy efficient process.”


Q

How do you strive to minimize impact and waste in various operational areas of your business such as product shipping, raw materials use, energy/water, etc.?

A

All of our products are shipped in cardboard, using dissolvable packing peanuts. The tissue paper is biodegradable, and the tape is made of paper. We also encourage customers to select their product with reduced packaging right on the website! This means the product will be delivered without its box. All of our products are handmade, making it an extremely energy efficient process.

Q

What are you observing about the new breed of conscious consumer and how they engage with you as a brand? What feedback do you hear from your customers about what consumers now expect from the brands they buy from?

A

Consumers have been shifting their purchases to support local brands and give back to their own communities. People all over the world are transitioning to more natural products, through education and ingredient transparency. A large benefit of being a smaller brand is that customers really come to know me and I begin to build relationships with them- which leads them to place their trust in me and my creations.


“We practice functional minimalism, and use things up prior to replacing them.”


Q

In what ways do you as a brand give back to the community? Do you have any social mission endeavours or commitments to the development and wellbeing of people and communities through partnerships, non-profits, etc.?

A

The Cure Skincare donates to Good Bones routinely, the organization from which we adopted our first pup, Roti. In the past we’ve held free educational workshops, as well as donated to women’s shelters throughout the country. We are hoping to incorporate more of this meaningful work into the company in the future.

Q

In what ways do you, yourself, adopt an environmentally-friendly lifestyle at home?

A

Personally, moving to rural Nova Scotia has really shifted things for my partner and I. Caring for our septic and well is something we never thought about in Toronto or Halifax. Since the move, we’ve transitioned back to basics. We use only baking soda and vinegar for cleaning, and purchase as much locally as we can. We practice functional minimalism, and use things up prior to replacing them. When it comes to food, we consume produce in full, utilizing each part of the plant, and have scaled back our meat consumption. My husband Steve makes most of our furniture from locally sourced lumber, and we have a flourishing garden. We’re both fortunate enough to work from home which has helped to reduce our commute-based carbon footprint.

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